Tag Archives: doctor-patient relationship

Associated Press: Consumers losing doctors with new insurance plans

From the Associated Press:

[M]ore consumers realize they bought plans with limited doctor and hospital networks, some after websites that mistakenly said their doctors were included.

Before the law took effect, experts warned that narrow networks could impact patient’s access to care, especially in cheaper plans. But with insurance cards now in hand, consumers are finding their access limited across all price ranges.

The dilemma undercuts President Obama’s 2009 pledge that: “If you like your doctor, you will be able to keep your doctor, period.”

More: Consumers losing doctors with new insurance plans – The Washington Post.

Via the NCPA.

Leave a comment

Filed under insurance, tax code, HSAs

Should Doctors Limit Medical Care To Save Money For ‘Society’?

Paul Hsieh, MD writes:

There will always be limits on who will or will not receive expensive medical treatments. We have no choice about that. But we do have a choice of whether those decisions will be made by patients based on their personal and economic priorities — or by government bureaucrats. The first protects the doctor-patient relationship. The second creates divided loyalties for doctors, who will always be serving two masters. As a doctor, I prefer the first. As a patient, you should too.

Read more: Should Doctors Limit Medical Care To Save Money For ‘Society’?.

Leave a comment

Filed under insurance, tax code, HSAs, Medicaid/Medicare/SCHIP, physicians & medical quality

Paul Hsieh, MD: Why Doctors Should Not Ask Their Patients About Guns

Paul Hsieh, MD in Forbes:

Should doctors ask patients if they own guns? Currently, ObamaCare bans the federal government from using patient medical records to compile a list of gun owners. But following the Newtown, CT shootings, President Obama issued an executive order clarifying that “the Affordable Care Act [ObamaCare] does not prohibit doctors asking their patients about guns in their homes.” The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) similarly encourages physicians to ask patients if they own firearms — in the name of protecting child safety. As a physician, I consider this advice misguided. Instead, physicians should not routinely ask patients whether they own guns, because it could compromise the integrity of the doctor-patient relationship. …

University of Chicago economics professor Steven Levitt has also warned about excessive fear mongering about gun ownership. In their best sellerFreakonomics, he and co-author Stephen Dubner note that a child is 100 times more likely to die in a swimming accident than a gun accident.

Yet the AAP does not tell parents to “NEVER bring your child to a swimming pool,” nor does it advocate “the strongest possible regulations of swimming pool ownership.” Rather, it recommends that parents supervise children around swimming pools and follow basic rules of water safety. The AAP correctly recognizes that a home swimming pool can be a genuine value to a family, provided that parents and children follow proper precautions. Similarly, a gun can be a genuine value to responsible homeowners, provided that parents and children follow proper precautions. …

A local colleague, Dr. Matthew Bowdish, has declared, “I will not undermine the Second or Fourth Amendment rights of any of my patients who are lawful gun owners. Nor will I record my patients’ gun ownership status in any medical records that could be accessed by government officials unless relevant to a specific medical issue.” This should be the credo of all freedom-loving physicians.

via Why Doctors Should Not Ask Their Patients About Guns – Forbes.

1 Comment

Filed under physicians & medical quality, Policy - National

What reach your doctor 24/7? Pay her directly at a new Denver care center

Economist John Goodman explains why you typically cannot reach your doctor on the phone or over the Internet: Medicare and insurers don’t pay them for this. This changes when you pay your doctor directly. The Denver Business Journal reports on a new direct-pay medical office where doctors are available at all times:

Dialysis center giant DaVita Inc. has opened its first primary-care center in Colorado, offering concierge medicine to both employees and outsiders in what it says is an effort to improve health and reduce costs by competing with traditional physicians’ practices.

Paladina Health LLC, a clinic that opened on Sept. 3 at 1783 15th St., offers two physicians and two medical assistants to treat individuals or employers who pay a monthly fee. …

Under the concierge medicine concept practiced there, patients will pay a monthly fee — $99 for adults, $59 for children and various negotiated prices for companies — and receive unlimited services from doctors rather than paying per visit, Steinfort said.

By allowing doctors to spend more time with patients, and be available to them via cellphone and web portal at all times, DaVita believes it can drive improvements to customer service and to health while cutting the cost of care if patients don’t wait until they are severely ill to see a doctor, Steinfort said.

via DaVita opens Denver health care office.

At the Center for Individual Freedom, Ashton Ellis gives more background on direct-pay medicine:

Tom Blue, Executive Director of the American Academy of Private Physicians, says that doctors are seeing revenue drop precipitously as the costs of regulations, drugs and medical liability skyrocket, while reimbursements from public and private insurance providers plunge.

In response, Blue says that a growing number of doctors are converting their practices to a new business model that cuts out the middle men, and enhances the doctor-patient relationship.

Direct-pay medical contracts require a one-time annual fee that buys 24/7 access to a primary care physician, same day appointments and a doctor-patient relationship reminiscent of an era before third party insurers and government subsidies.

More: Direct-Pay Medicine: A Free Market Approach to Healthcare Reform

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

It’s Not Just the Mandate: ObamaCare’s Other Infringements

Paul Hsieh, MD reviews how ObamaCare violates our liberties in ways other than forcing us to buy politically-controlled health plans. Controlling doctors is one aspect. He writes:

The escalating economic costs of ObamaCare are bad enough. But they pale in comparison to the coming escalating losses of our medical freedom. As a patient, do you want your doctor to be free to practice according his best independent judgment for your best medical interests, or compelled to practice according to government guidelines, beholden to the state for his livelihood?

via PJ Media » It’s Not Just the Mandate: ObamaCare’s Other Infringements.

Leave a comment

Filed under Policy - National

Worse Than Death Panels: Evidence-Based Medicine

What’s worse than death panels? Government-mandated “evidence-based medicine.”  John Goodman explains:

Now it seems the Obama administration is contemplating something that is even scarier: doctors would be given immunity from malpractice lawsuits, but only if they practice medicine according to government guidelines. The pressure would be enormous. Have you ever met a doctor who wanted to be sued? …

Washington telling the medical community how to practice medicine. Even though a recent study finds little relationship between the inputs Medicare wants to pay for and such outputs as patient survival. …

Remember these words: “evidence-based care.” They are likely to be very much a part of your future. …

So what’s wrong with evidence-based medicine? Wouldn’t you want your doctor to make decisions based on scientifically verified evidence?

Think about the calendar you keep on your laptop or your cell phone. It’s probably an invaluable aide to help you organize your life. Now suppose that instead of being your servant, the calendar becomes your master.  …

Not only are there no treatment guidelines in most areas of medicine, where there are, they are often unreliable, conflicting and incomplete.

Read the whole post at TownHall.com: Worse than Death Panels. Via FIRM.

Leave a comment

Filed under Medicaid/Medicare/SCHIP, physicians & medical quality

Big Brother Is Watching Your Doctor

At Forbes.com, Grace-Marie Turner writes:

One of the biggest fears the American people have about the new health overhaul law is that government will control decisions involving their health care, usurping the doctor-patient relationship.

They have reason to be afraid. A report is in which details the blast of $1.1 billion in early spending on “comparative effectiveness research” (CER) by the Obama administration, and it shows the government already is setting up the systems to direct doctors to practice Washington-approved medicine. …

Government CER sounds like a progressive solution, but it is actually a frightening move that puts government detailers between patients and doctors and favors one-size-fits-none cost cutting over continued medical progress.

via Big Brother Is Watching Your Doctor – Forbes.

Leave a comment

Filed under physicians & medical quality